Outsmart Waste

unconsumption:


Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.
Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.
He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

unconsumption:

Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.

Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.

He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)


unconsumption:

junkculture:

Gasoline Canister Sculptures by Gerd Rohling

German artist Gerd Rohling creates sculptural pieces of art using found materials that he collects from the streets of Berlin. His exhibition titled “NOTHING FOR ALL” at gallery Piet Hein Eek features a series of brilliantly inventive sculptures made from discarded gasoline containers which he has simply cut into angular faces. Some of the faces seem to be sporting masks, while others have halos and hats made from rubber tires and waste baskets. Rohling’s work is a visually striking statement against pollution and serves as a reminder to recycle plastic waste.


landscapelifescape:

Rockland County, New York, USA

Foggy Sunrise by Dave B


wwf:

To raise awareness about the impact of global warming, WWF-Paraguay made a lunch cooked on the asphalt. RID 3790

posted 1 day ago via wwf with 143 notes

wowtastic-nature:

Paths Through The Sorel Carpet by  Trevor O'Hare on 500px.com (Original Size - Height: 6016px - Width: 4000px)

wowtastic-nature:

Paths Through The Sorel Carpet by Trevor O'Hare on 500px.com
(Original Size - Height: 6016px - Width: 4000px)


drewparkerphotography:

A Grand Reflection
….by Spectacle Photography

drewparkerphotography:

A Grand Reflection

….by Spectacle Photography


photorufus:

Tobermory, Ontario

photorufus:

Tobermory, Ontario

posted 1 day ago via terracycle · © photorufus with 64 notes

iwanttoberecycled:

I want to be shady.

iwanttoberecycled:

I want to be shady.


unconsumption:


Valencia-based designer Dan Gestoso’s bicycle design concept, Boske, is an IKEA-like bike with a wooden frame and mechanical pieces that are made out of aluminum cans.

More: Bike Concept Is Made Out Of Old Soda Cans [Pics] - PSFK

unconsumption:

Valencia-based designer Dan Gestoso’s bicycle design concept, Boske, is an IKEA-like bike with a wooden frame and mechanical pieces that are made out of aluminum cans.

More: Bike Concept Is Made Out Of Old Soda Cans [Pics] - PSFK